What Happened To Czechoslovakia After The Munich Agreement

Later, at the meeting, a deception was agreed in advance to influence and pressure Chamberlain: one of Hitler`s accomplices entered the room to inform Hitler of other Germans killed in Czechoslovakia, and Hitler then shouted: “I will avenge each of them. The Czechs must be destroyed. [32] The meeting ended with Hitler`s refusal to make concessions to the demands of the Allies. [32] Later that evening, Hitler was concerned that he had gone too far to put pressure on Chamberlain, and he called Chamberlain`s hotel suite to say that he would only accept the annexation of Sudetenland without plans in other areas, provided that Czechoslovakia began evacuating ethnic Chechens from the majority regions of Germany by 8 p.m. on September 26. After being pushed by Chamberlain, Hitler agreed to issue the ultimatum for October 1 (the same date on which Operation Green was to begin). [37] Hitler then told Chamberlain that it was a concession he wanted to make to the Prime Minister as a “gift”, out of respect for the fact that Chamberlain was prepared to back down a little from his previous position. [37] Hitler added that after the annexation of the Sudetenland, Germany would no longer have territorial rights over Czechoslovakia and would enter into a collective agreement to guarantee the borders of Germany and Czechoslovakia. [37] In the spring of 1938, Hitler openly began to support calls by German spokesmen in the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia for closer relations with Germany. Hitler had recently annexed Austria to Germany and the conquest of Czechoslovakia was the next step in his plan to create a “Greater Germany”.

The Czechoslovakian government hoped that Britain and France would help in the event of a German invasion, but British Prime Minister Chamberlain tried to avoid war. He made two trips to Germany in September and offered favorable agreements to Hitler, but Fuhrer responded to his demands. On 30.m September, 11 hours after the Czechoslovakian government agreed to the Munich terms, Poland issued an ultimatum to the Czechoslovakian government. [78] It demanded the immediate evacuation of Czechoslovakian troops and police and gave Prague until noon the next day. On 1 October at 11:45 a.m. .m. the Czechoslovak Foreign Ministry called the Polish ambassador in Prague to tell him that Poland could get what it wanted, but then asked for a 24-hour delay. On 2 October, the Polish army, under the command of General W. Bortnowski, annexed an area of 801.5 km2 with 227,399 inhabitants. The attached area was divided between Frysztat County and Cieszyn County. [79] At the same time, Slovakia lost 10,390 km2 to Hungary, which has a population of 854,277. The Manchester Guardian covered every corner of history, from the details of the deal Chamberlain, which appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, to unease among other nations.

One editorial found that the sheet of paper he was waving on his return to Britain was almost worthless. 29-30 September 1938: Germany, Italy, Great Britain and France sign the Munich Agreement by which Czechoslovakia must cede its border and defensive regions (the so-called Sudetenland) to Nazi Germany. German troops occupied these territories between 1 and 10 October 1938. Czechoslovakia was informed by Great Britain and France that it could either oppose Nazi Germany or submit to the prescribed annexes.